One of the ways Ivy Ed is different from other test prep companies is through our unique use of calculator programs on approved calculators.  We offer free one-hour workshops for these helpful programs as part of our instruction.  However, during the most recent administration of the ACT, some students were incorrectly told by proctors at a few New Jersey testing locations that they needed to clear their calculator programs/RAM in their approved calculators.  We understand that this may have caused frustration and confusion on test day, and we want to prevent this from happening to all students, whether or not they prepare with Ivy Ed.  

We called the ACT company and students who were erroneously told to clear their calculator’s memory can file a center feedback form.  Considerations are made on a case by case basis and students should submit feedback as soon as possible since there is a two-week window during which students may send these forms:

http://www.act.org/content/act/en/products-and-services/the-act/test-center-feedback-form.html

To prevent this from happening in the future, we have posted a letter students can print and use at testing experiences for the ACT:

https://ivyed.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/CalculatorLetter2017.pdf

We also have one for the SAT:

https://ivyed.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/CalculatorLetter2017SAT.pdf

If students encounter test center irregularities for the SAT, they should contact the College Board immediately at testcenter@info.collegeboard.org, since complaints need to be filed by the Wednesday after the exam.

If you are interested in reading the fine print of calculator policies for each test, you can find them here for the ACT and SAT, respectively:

http://www.act.org/content/act/en/products-and-services/the-act/taking-the-test/calculator-policy.html

https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/taking-the-test/calculator-policy

We hope that your testing experience goes smoothly, but every now and then there are snags.  We suggest that on the day of the test you get back into the game, even if you feel a center or proctor has inconsistencies, and then you seek appropriate recourse in the days immediately following the test.